Last edited by Moogugor
Wednesday, May 20, 2020 | History

2 edition of Children"s understanding of text, interpretation and knowledge found in the catalog.

Children"s understanding of text, interpretation and knowledge

David R. Olson

Children"s understanding of text, interpretation and knowledge

final report for 1989/90

by David R. Olson

  • 331 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Ontario Institute for Studies in Education in [Toronto .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Reading comprehension,
  • Literacy,
  • Cognition in children

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDavid R. Olson and Nancy Torrance.
    ContributionsTorrance, Nancy., Ontario Institute for Studies in Education.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination1 v. (various pagings) :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21252789M

    In fact, expert readers co-construct meaning WITH a text. The research base shows that reading is a "transaction" in which the reader brings purposes and life experiences to bear to converse with the text. This meeting of the reader and the text results in the meaning that is comprehension.   This paper reports on two studies which investigated the relationship between children's texting behaviour, their knowledge of text abbreviations and their school attainment in written language skills. In Study One, 11–12‐year‐old children provided information on their texting behaviour.

    Text Talk: Capturing the benefits of read- Keeping Important text ideas in responses and ideas are keys aloud for young children successful read-alouds. oncern about young children's lan- guage development has recently cen- tered on the large individual differences among children in vocabulary and comprehension. realize that the study provides much valuable information about children’s understanding of informational text, independent of intervention effects. Accordingly, the purpose of this article is to describe the study in the context of the growing body of knowledge on informational text comprehension and use in the early elementary grades.

    Theme and Knowledge Demands Most children should be able to grasp the meaning of the text without prior knowledge, except for understanding what a forest is. 3 Reader-Task Suggestions Based on each child’s assessment results, use the Reader-Task Suggestions from the Text Complexity rubric to provide background knowledge or scaffold. Understanding Text Structure. In nonfiction book (books about real people and real events), readers often find a variety of structures that authors use to tell a story. Some of the text structures in nonfiction include photos, captions, graphs, maps, bold print, and a glossary.


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Children"s understanding of text, interpretation and knowledge by David R. Olson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Selecting texts that will support the child’s present knowledge and skills. Selecting a variety of texts and text types to promote the flexible use of the child’s knowledge in new situations. Introducing texts by activating prior knowledge about the story and building experiences needed to enhance understanding.

The student examples show that students can be pushed to rise to the occasion when directed appropriately. The book outlines an interpretation framework in a realistic way that can be directly applied to the classroom at all grade levels. I loved the resources and text suggestions listed in the book.4/5(7).

This book is a great resource for any teacher who is interested in literacy education. It offer great tools and recommends great books for K-8 teachers and high school reading teachers. In addition, it is a wonderful book to use when teaching Children's Literature at the college level. Dr.5/5(2). Eliminating children from Study 2 with no evident grasp of false belief (False Belief understanding scores of 0) as well as those whose understanding of interpretation was at ceiling (Interpretive Understanding scores of 2), resulted in a sample of children Cited by: In order to effectively develop children’s RfP, teachers need to develop: 1.

Considerable knowledge of children’s literature and other texts 2. Knowledge of children’s reading practices 3. An RfP pedagogy, encompassing: • social reading environments • reading aloud • informal book talk, inside-text talk and recommendations.

Children's books play a vital role in education, and this book helps you to choose books that have the most to offer young children. Each chapter reflects on a different theme or genre and their role in educational settings, and recommends ten 'must reads' within each one.

The themes covered include: books for babies - literature for the very young - narrative fiction - books in translation. “Reading for meaning” means students focus on discussing and understanding what they are reading, not just pronouncing the words correctly.

Adults can help kids “read for meaning” by asking two main types of questions – literal and inferential. About literal questions. Literal questions focus on the who, what, where, and when of the text.

A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text.

will use literary knowledge accessed through print and visual media to connect self to society and culture. apply knowledge gained from literature as a basis for understanding self and society by a. using literature as a resource for shaping decisions; b.

using literature as a resource for understanding social and political issues. Schema is the background knowledge and experience readers bring to the text. Good readers draw on prior knowledge and experience to help them understand what they are reading and are thus able to use that knowledge to make connections.

Book Description. Clearly organized and beautifully written, Interpreting Literature With Children is a remarkable book that stands on the edge of two textbook genres: the survey of literature text and the literary criticism text. Neither approach, however, says enough about how children respond to literature in everyday classroom situations.

The ability to visualise the features of a text type, and how those features are arranged, is vital to the construction of meaning when reading. When a student is able to visualise in this way, they understand texts at a much deeper level, and so have real control over them.

They used their understanding of a familiar genre to help them learn from a new text. More specifically, students were relying on what is called a "textual schema"—a generic understanding of what to expect from various forms of discourse (Anderson et al., ).

An understanding of text genre can help students in every grade learn from text. Whilst many of the Teachers as Readers (TaRs) teachers knew their children’s reading scores/levels, their targets and the colour band they were given to select books from, many readily acknowledged they knew little about the children’s preferences as readers, their favourite genres, authors, text types for instance or their everyday reading practices at home.

The knowledge and skills base required for teaching reading well is extensive. This outline of a proposed curriculum for teacher education programs in reading covers knowledge of reading development, language structure, and strategies for instruction and assessment.

Whether fiction or non-fiction, a picture book can help children gain knowledge and move them to ask new questions about history, inventions, nature, other cultures, and more. Build Reading Skills Picture books help young children understand that words convey meaning, well before they are aware of the text.

Informational books help children acquire content knowledge. Informational books help children learn about things that are impossible or impracticable to experience first-hand.

Even when first-hand access to information is possible, informational books allow children to see things they might not otherwise notice. Literacy learning requires instruction and practice, and this learning occurs across discrete stages.

The following notes explore the five stages of reading development as proposed by Maryanne Wolf () in her book Proust and the squid: the story and science of the reading brain.

These five stages are. Inthe RAND Report on Reading for Understanding defined the term “reading comprehension” as the process of simultaneously extracting and constructing meaning through interaction and involvement with written language.

Good reading comprehension requires many different abilities. Some of these, such as accurate decoding and text fluency, are not specifically reading comprehension. Teaching children to build and activate their background knowledge usually includes some or all of the following: Making simple personal connections.

We often begin by reading aloud fiction picture books about friends, families, and the ups and downs of children’s daily lives.

Debbie Miller says synthesizing is “the process through which readers bring together their background knowledge and their evolving understanding of the book to create a complete and original understanding of the text.” (Reading with Meaning, p. ).The Interpretation of Texts Let us begin by reminding ourselves of some of the uncontroversial facts about the interpretation of texts.

Some texts are obvious, and some are relatively perplexing and inscrutable, but even the most obvious are interpretable only with the aid of .Reading comes alive when we recognize how the ideas in a text connect to our experiences and beliefs, events happening in the larger world, our understanding of history, and our knowledge of other texts.

The Text-to-Text, Text-to-Self, Text-to-World strategy helps students develop the habit of making these connections as they read.